Animal Anomalies at Paxton Gate 2010

Animal Anomalies is a curated collection of animal misfits... 

Pavo Cristatus

Pavo Cristatus

The peafowl commonly known as the peacock is the genus Pavo of the pheasant family, Phasianidae. This Indian Peafowl, Pavo Cristatus, was discovered on the west coast of the Andaman Islands in South East Asia. The peacock is designated as the national bird of India and the provincial bird of the Punjab, but the third eye that this peacock was born with caused the bird to be revered by a local tribe. According the the islanders, the peacock had healing powers and could predict future events. Local custom dictated that virgin tribeswomen would scatter flower petals and seeds in front of the bird during a ceremony to select a bride for the eldest unmarried tribesman. The pile that the bird ate from first determined which young woman would be selected as the tribesman’s first and most honorable wife. The numbering of wives would follow in order as the bird continued to eat from each pile. On 26 December 2004 the coast of the Andaman Islands was devastated by a 10-metre (33 ft) high tsunami following the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and the village and shrine to the peacock were lost.

Siamese Llama

Siamese Llama

This siamese llama is part of the llama glama family which is a domesticated species of South American camelid. The llama glama appears to have originated from the central plains of North America about 40 million years ago. They migrated to South America about 3 million years ago. By the end of the last ice age camelids were extinct in North America. As of 2007, there were over 7 million llamas in South America. The siamese variation of the llama glama is very rare and only occurs on average once in every 1,000,000 live births. The last live sighting of the siamese llama glama was in 1942 by Dr. Henry Hawkins on his expedition to the Andes Mountains.

Symbiosis

Symbiosis

Symbiosis (from Ancient Greek sýn "with" and bíōsis "living") is close and often long-term interactions between different biological species. In 1877 Bennett used the word symbiosis (which previously had been used of people living together in community) to describe the mutualistic relationship in lichens. In 1879 by the German mycologist Heinrich Anton de Bary, defined it as "the living together of unlike organisms." These owls are of common species, but are unique in their symbiotic existence. In is still unclear to scientists how these three species of owls aid one another in survival. Several groupings are kept in captivity in private habitats while being researched, but these nocturnal woodland owls are most commonly found in North America’s coniferous forests.

Glaucidium Crypsis

Glaucidium Crypsis

Glaucidium Crypsis is a type of pygmy owl that camouflages to its surroundings. Glaucidium Crypsis belong to the typical owl family Strigidae, one of the two generally accepted living families of owls. The genus consists of about 26 to 35 species distributed worldwide. The exact number of species is somewhat disputed. Unlike other animals that use camouflage to blend into their environment, this species of owl has the unique capability to change its appearance to that of its artificial surroundings. This particular breed of owl became popular in the 1970s as a house pet when the novelty of its adaptation became evident. The species was over bred in the late 1970s and is now extinct. This collection of pygmy owls is the only of its kind, depicting each owl with its original wallpaper from its domestic habitat circa 1972-1985.

Glaucidium Crypsis

Glaucidium Crypsis

Glaucidium Crypsis is a type of pygmy owl that camouflages to its surroundings. Glaucidium Crypsis belong to the typical owl family Strigidae, one of the two generally accepted living families of owls. The genus consists of about 26 to 35 species distributed worldwide. The exact number of species is somewhat disputed. Unlike other animals that use camouflage to blend into their environment, this species of owl has the unique capability to change its appearance to that of its artificial surroundings. This particular breed of owl became popular in the 1970s as a house pet when the novelty of its adaptation became evident. The species was over bred in the late 1970s and is now extinct. This collection of pygmy owls is the only of its kind, depicting each owl with its original wallpaper from its domestic habitat circa 1972-1985.